Always Consider Gravity

02.10.2016

0830

When I create a solution for any situation in my life, I always, always consider gravity first. Being that I also live in the Bay Area, items tend to fall when earthquakes occur. My solution to this issue is hanging everything. I keep extra shoelaces, metal rings, and carabiners around for this very reason.

I also like to keep my floor clear because when I run around with my microfiber dust mop, I don’t like to move things. In other words, items wont be on the floor to get in my way. This rule applies for any surface area in my home as well. I’m simply not a big fan of dusting. I will dust, but it has to be a once over type of effort, for me to move items, then dust, and then place items back feels like a waste of time and effort. Multiply that task for each week of the year, and the wasted time will add up.

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I hang many items around, but these are a few of the examples. I hang my mirror on my door along with a pencil bag that holds my dry erase pens to write on the mirror with. I actually draw a calendar on my mirror for the fact that I know I wont miss it when I check myself in the mirror. (It also helps because I don’t like to buy paper calendars.) I use a laptop and I hate the sound of my transformer box dragging across my hard wood floor, so I made a denim pocket out of an old pair of jeans to hang it up. I also cut a hole on the other side of the pocket for the other cord to poke out of. My drafting table ruler is also hanging next to it since I now use my drafting table as my desk and it was getting in the way. I have a 3-tier basket which I place items that would normally find their way onto the surface of the kitchenette counter, and I even have other items hanging from that was well.

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Using shoelaces, I hang my memory board up to cover the window on my door. There was a small gap when I hung it up, so I used a fabric napkin to simply cover the opening. I’ve always hung up my kitchen timer as well. I used a magnet clip and simply took a hook screw and attached it to the top, and not screwing it too far in as to hit the bell on the inside. My bookshelf is also right next to my desk (this desk has no drawers) so I hang up my pencil holder as well.

These are just a few items that I hang up. Hanging up items is an easier way to maintain my space and I know that if an earthquake was to ever occur, these items wont fall. On top of that- dusting is a breeze.

Functionality Above All Else

01.27.2016

0730

So I was tired of watching my mom cook on the dim lit stove. I wanted to buy an under cabinet light, but as I scrolled through the cabinet light section of local hardware  and appliance stores, I realized that although they are very nice lights, they all require a specific mounting system as well as specific light bulbs- which I would also have to purchase. I didn’t want her to have to go out and buy a new light bulbs for her under cabinet light each time it burned out. It’s a hassle and they always come in packages of ten bulbs.

Now mind you, I am the type who likes to keep my “supplies” to a minimum. (ie. I prefer to need a AAA than any other battery, and I own 4 items that need batteries) I also prefer CFL light bulbs, and I mean the kind of light bulbs that fit into every kind of socket (which also means all of my lamps need to require the same type of light bulb). I don’t want to have to go out and buy a different kind of light bulb for every single kind of lamp that I own.

So this design problem lead me to come up with this solution. I have an extra clamp light that I don’t use anymore. I like clamp lights because they’re quite versatile and they’re gravity friendly.

The solution I came up with was to use the clamp lamp and clamp it to one of the cabinets. I wrapped some extra white athletic tape wrapped around the neck so it doesn’t stand out as much. I then used screws to pin the cord under the cabinet to hide it a bit. I used a piece of extra shoelace and tied a loop so that the cord can be hung up and out of the way when not in use. I also wanted to make this loop because I knew she wouldn’t be able to reach the lamp switch easily, so I wanted her to be able to control the light from the cord plug instead.

This was the solution I came up with:

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This is what my mom’s stove looked like without the new lamp plugged in (basically with the current lighting set up):

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And this is what the stove looks like with the new lamp plugged in with the new light brightness:

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I know this may look strange, but my requirements for what comes into the home is very specific. Although buying a new under cabinet light would have been the ideal solution, in the long run, there would still have to be a surplus of different kinds of light bulbs for all of the lamps in the home. If I’m able to keep that number to a minimum (as in only 1 kind of light bulb), I’m going to. By purchasing a new under cabinet lamp, it would have solved the lighting issue, but would have brought on another issue of keeping that light bulb in stock. From that problem, also brings up the issue of recycling the lamps and how often that needs to be done (ie. if the light bulbs from the under cabinet light burn out quicker than regular CFL light bulbs)

So I didn’t have to buy a new lamp, which would include packaging that would end up in the landfill, new light bulbs to accommodate it and I used an item I already owned. With this solution, all of the lamps in the house can use the exact same type of light bulb. Invest in clamp lights, they’re very useful 🙂

A Zero Waste Lifestyle

01.17.2016

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Before I went zero waste, I used to buy anything bottled, use sponges in the sink, bought spices packaged in plastic bags and also in glass jars, and the worst culprit of all was that I bought packaged foods.

Kitchen Now:

  1. Whole Foods Market: Bulk balsamic vinegar, Bragg’s Liquid Amnios, raw honey, candy, oats, black beans, whole wheat flour, cane sugar, cranberries, spices and coffee.
  2. Philz Coffee: Loose leaf green tea and chamomile tea (and coffee if I want Philz coffee each morning)
  3. Kitchen Items: 3 pots & pans, 1 grill, 1 set of basic flatware, 1 set of basic kitchen utensils, 1 hand held mixer, 2 silicone bakeware pans, 1 dinnerware set, 1 set of mixing bowls, 1 set of Pyrex storage containers
  4.  Dining: Cloth napkins and kitchen towels, Tea infusers, re-useable wine corks, wind-up flash light and I now compost everything
  5. Recyclable products: Soups, baking soda, and occasionally wine

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Living Room Now:

  1. Giant/small towels as floor mats and door mats, I hate that the rubber backing on standard door mats falls apart after exposure to weathering.
  2. I buy digital books or I check out books from the library (Fortunately I bought an iPad when I started grad school so it came in handy)
  3. I use an indoor air filtering plant to liven up the space as well as making it functional as well.
  4. I limit the amount of batteries I need/use. I replaced my flashlight with a wind up flashlight and in total I have 3 items that uses batteries. In addition to that, I limit the size of batteries to AAA or AA (it’s really not necessary to have a library of them and it makes attaining them harder when traveling).
  5. Christmas bag: Flour sack towels (28″x 29″) and bandannas for wrapping gifts. If you wrap gifts using basic box wrapping techniques and then tuck the ends within the folds, you can always secure the wrapping. Or check out Furoshiki and check out the techniques they list and their products they have available.
    1. Here are some examples from the website:

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Office Now:

  1. I use refillable ball point pens and lead and replace them in my pen/pencil unit
  2. Due to my profession, moving away from rendering materials is quite difficult so I do use colored pencils and a lead holder as well as a Faber-Castell kneaded eraser. (The kneaded eraser doesn’t slough off eraser bits)
  3. I used to keep my work saved on re-writable CDs but now I have a 1 TB external hard drive. I also utilize my emails and use my clouds to store data.
  4. I use a stapleless stapler so now I don’t buy staples for refilling and it’s very efficient
  5. I’ve opted out of junk mail as much as I can but some mail still gets through, when it does, I use the back of the one sided pages as scratch paper (I can’t remember when the last time I bought paper).
  6. Recyclable products: Envelopes, stamps and Christmas cards… There are still items I value and I can’t seem to stray from and hand writing is one of them. I value a hand written letter, the ink/lead on paper denotes a moment in time- a moment in time when the writer touched the document as well as the receiver.

This is an over all view of what my life inventory looks like now. It makes life a lot easier when I have less to worry about. Majority of my time, I think I’d prefer eating food or going on an adventure. Once I got rid of a lot of my items, I noticed that I sleep better now, my stress level seems to lessen because there’s less upkeep with my life. It’s strange how when I used to think of hanging out with my friends meant that we would go shopping (and not window shopping), and now that shopping really isn’t a part of my life- I had to search to find what to replace it with. Even if I had the choice to document my life in photographs, I think there’s still a pressure to do so- sometimes, the memories are enough to take away from that experience.