DIY Dry Shampoo

02.20.2018

0600

Materials:

  • 1/2 Cup Cacao Powder
  • 1/2 Cup Cornstarch

Tools:

  • Bowl for mixing
  • Spoon to scoop
  • Empty Plastic or glass container for the final mix.

 

 

00- Kingsford Cornstarch00- Hersheys Special Dark 100 Cacao

Hair contains natural oil, called sebum in its follicles which is essential for keeping itself conditioned and healthy. Frequent washing, combined with some of the harsh chemicals in shampoo, strips away those oils leaving your hair in bad shape. You can rid your hair of excess oil buildup by adopting the “No Poo Method”.

The theory of “No Poo” is this: by washing hair with a gentle alternative to shampoo, such as corn starch, baking soda and apple cider vinegar, you’ll achieve clean hair without the damage or dependency on daily shampooing. So, instead of allowing chemicals in shampoo to strip your hair, strip away the chemicals instead and stop using shampoo altogether.

My hairstylist, Carrie Everheardt, highly recommended me to start using dry shampoo. She recommends washing your hair about two times a week and treating your hair with dry shampoo during the rest of the week. If you’re just starting out using dry shampoo, you can practice increasing the increments of days between washes, and work up to a time frame you’re comfortable with; e.g. use dry shampoo twice a week, three times a week, four times a week, etc.

Also, if you’re in the Bay Area, in California, you can find Carrie at The Salon of Woodside. Her instagram is @everheartloveshair . She amazing at recognizing what your hair damages are and knows what it takes to heal your hair and scalp. Go check her out!

WHY USE DRY SHAMPOO…

Washing your hair daily is bad for you. It strips away the natural oils that keep your hair healthy and well moisturized.

A “dry shampoo” is really just an oil-absorbing powder that, when applied to hair, can soak up excess grease and dirt without necessitating getting the hair wet. Dry shampoo absorbs the oil produced by your scalp, and it cannot do its job if there is any water in your hair.

If you’re not planning to shampoo in the morning, apply your dry shampoo the night before. Apply it on before bed and let the product fight excess oil while you sleep. A quick brush of dry shampoo can refresh hair after a workout, saving time in the locker room.

Benefits of using dry shampoo…

1. It replaces a wash.
The dry stuff soaks up grease and leaves a fresh scent, so hair looks and smells just-washed.

2. It volumizes limp strands (even bangs!).
Dry shampoo “fluffs” flat hair, creating instant fullness.

4. It slows color fade.
Since water and shampoo leach dye from hair, washing less means you can go longer between touch-ups. Cash saved!

5. It minimizes damage.
If you’re shampooing less often, you’re also using hot tools less often. The result: healthier hair.

6. You can use it whenever.
Dry shampoo can be applied any time your hair needs a boost, but I like using it before bed: Hair will absorb it as I sleep and I’ll look refreshed in the morning.

MIXING…

Since my hair is a dark brown-black combo (depending on where the sunlight hits), I mix equal amounts of cornstarch and cacao powder in a bowl. For those who have blond hair, mixing cacao powder will not be necessary. Brunettes and redheads can use cacao powder, cinnamon or a combination of both as desired.

Because everyone’s hair tint is different, I suggest testing out the color combo by adding a little bit more to the mix, until desired. If you think you’ve added too much, don’t worry because once you fluff up your hair, the likelihood is that it won’t be detectable.

I store my dry shampoo mix in an old plastic peanut butter container. I wanted my container to be more narrow than wide due to the fact that my application brush was tall.

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APPLICATION…

I part my hair in three sections, a left part, center part and a part on the right side of my head.

00- Hair Parting Directions

Using my large brush, I lightly tap the head of my brush into my mix, and then tap the brush on the edge of the jar to remove the excess powder. I noticed that my brush carried a lot of the mix between the strands and if I didn’t tap off the extra powder, my brush would end up dumping a lot of the power in the first spot selected.

For each part that I created, I simply brushed my hairline with the mix. You really don’t need a lot for the applications, because  you’re also spreading it around with the brush.

After applying my dry shampoo on each parted line, I fluffed up my hair by raking my fingers through my hair and fluffing it upwards and outwards.

That’s literally all I do to apply my dry shampoo. Some people wash their hair with apple cider vinegar after about five days of using dry shampoo to remove the dry shampoo buildup. If you want to try this:

  1. Blend one cup of water with two to four tablespoons of vinegar to make your rinse.
  2. After you have shampooed and thoroughly rinsed your hair, slowly pour or spray the mixture over your entire scalp, allowing it to run down the length of your hair (being careful not to get it in your eyes).
  3. Make sure you let it to sit in the hair for at least three minutes, then rise out completely.

If you’re someone who would like to try this recipe out, I highly recommend it. I was skeptical before using it, but I was amazed at how much healthier my hair looked once I gave it a chance retain its natural oils. Also, with this mix, my hair ends up smelling like  a faint scent of chocolate, and I can’t be mad at that.

P.S.

Since I have very light colored bed sheet sets, I do cover my pillowcase with a set of brown silk pillowcases so that the cacao powder won’t get all over the light sheets. Plus, silk is very good for your hair when you sleep. Some of silk’s hypoallergenic properties include a natural resistance to dust mites, fungus and mold, in addition to many other allergens. Silk can be beneficial for your skin and hair. Sleeping on a silk pillowcase can help your skin stay healthy and smooth and can help reduce the appearance of facial wrinkles

 

 

 

 

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What’s My Carbon Footprint?

10.10.2017

0600

2017-10-10

 

I wanted to calculate my carbon footprint because I haven’t ever done so. I know that I watch what I buy and how much energy I use so I was hoping it would be low. There are aspects of my life I could probably change to reduce my carbon footprint, but I wanted a base number to start with. There are a few different carbon print calculators available, but this is the one I used. Also, I’m located in the United States of America, so I used the Nature Conservancy Carbon Calculator, from the Nature Conservancy.

Because these calculators consist of a lot of smaller chunks of information, I thought I would at least list out the information needed for this calculator. I had to go searching for a large chunk of information to input, when I filled out my survey. So here is the the many pieces of information I needed, that you might need as well if you choose to use this carbon footprint calculator:

  1. Get Started: A QUICK CARBON FOOTPRINT ESTIMATE
    1. Zip Code
    2. City
    3. County
    4. State Country
    5. How many people live in your household?
    6. What is your approximate gross annual household income?
  2. Travel:  HOW DO YOU GET AROUND?
    1. Car(s): (Miles per gallon)
    2. Public Transit: (Miles per year)
    3. Air Travel: (Miles per year)
  3. Home: HOW MUCH DO YOU USE IN YOUR HOME?
    1. Electricity ($/year)
    2. Natural Gas ($/year)
    3. Heating oil & Other Fuels ($/year)
    4. Square ft. of living space
    5. Water useage ($/year)
  4. Food: HOW MUCH DO YOU CONSUME OF EACH OF THE FOLLOWING?
    1. Simple Menu: (Daily calories per person)
      1. Meat, fish, eggs
      2. Grains & baked goods
      3. Dairy
      4. Fruits & vegetables
      5. Snacks, drinks, etc…
    2. Advanced Menu: (Daily calories per person)
      1. Beef, pork, lamb, veal
      2. Fish & seafood
      3. Other meat (processed, nuts, etc…)
      4. Poultry & eggs
      5. Grains & baked goods
      6. Dairy
      7. Fruits & Vegetables
      8. Snacks, drinks, etc…
    3. Shopping: HOW MUCH DO YOU SPEND ON EACH OF THE FOLLOWING?
      1. Simple Menu
        1. Goods  ($/month)
        2. Services  ($/month)
      2. Advanced Menu
        1. Goods  ($/month)
          1. Furniture & appliances
          2. Clothing
          3. Entertainment
          4. Paper, office & reading
          5. Personal care & cleaning
          6. Auto Parts
          7. Medical
        2. Services  ($/month)
          1. Health Care
          2. Information & Comunication
          3. Medical
          4. Vehicle Services
          5. Personal business & Finance
          6. Household Maintenance & Repair
          7. Organizations & Charity
          8. Other Services

So my results stated that my Total Footprint is 20 tons CO2/year, which is 59% better than average person. This is a good standing to start from. I’m actually quite happy with it. I could try to adjust my daily decisions to see if I can reduce my footprint a re-take the survey, but it’s a good starting point.

The last section in the calculator allows you to sign a pledge to stand with Climate Action. There are a few different carbon footprint calculators. I encourage you all to take a look at how large or small your carbon footprint is. It’s amazing when you see it written down in a calculated measure of your daily decisions. Here are a few other websites that also have carbon footprint calculators that might be of god use as well:

  1. Carbon Footprint Calculator
  2. The Nature Conservancy Carbon Footprint Calculator
  3. EPA Carbon Footprint Calculator
  4. WWF Footprint Calculator 
  5. Carbonfund Calculate 

TheNatureConservancy- Household Footprint

 

 

Returning To The Beach

06.06.2017

0700

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On my journey to a more minimalistic life, I donated items and slowly learned to not live without others. I didn’t donate everything to donation stations, but I also tried to donate to organizations that I knew, could use my items. For my college textbooks, I donated some of them back to the school libraries so perhaps other students could use them. For my alumni collegiate programs, I donated my scanner and other art materials to the materials library for future students.

When it came to items that I had collected from camping trips or even small rocks I collected throughout my childhood, I knew I had to return those items back to their rightful spots.

The beach was always a place where I still have fond memories of, along with my family. The smell of the air and the sand between our toes, and watching the ebb and flow of the tide coming in, all form a significant part of my childhood memories. We never lived by the beach, but it certainly impacted me enough to this day.

Among my “items to donate,” I found a bag of sea shells that my brother and I collected when we were young. I knew I had to return them to the beach, because that’s where they belonged. As a kid, I was so fond of the beach, I always wanted to take it home with me. I remember being excited to create a small sea shell collection and that all of these smaller items were mine. I wanted to know why I felt this way, and why I approached collecting items the way I did.

Our sense of ownership emerges at a very early age. Growing up, we learn to become attached to items, and the feelings of ownership over our possessions is a part of our culture. In psychology and behavioral economics, the endowment effect (also known as divestiture aversion and related to the mere ownership effect in social psychology), is the hypothesis that people ascribe more value to things merely because they own them. This means, that we value items more more highly as soon as we own them. Part of this reason is tied to how quickly we form connections between our sense of self and the items we consider ours. Even as children, we believe that our objects have a unique essence and prefer to not have a duplicate of the same item.

Looking back on my collection of sea shells, I never separated the idea of owning an object, and keeping the memories that the object produced. It seemed that having an object from that event, could and would bring forth the memory of that event. Even so, if I had to attach an object to the event, I think I would only choose to attach a photo to it now. But with all of the social media and everyone seemingly documenting their lives, even photographing events wears on me.

So I’m returning the sea shells. I’m returning them to their rightful home and where they belong. I return a lot of items that I know have homes other than my own. I’ve returned dry cleaner hangers to my local dry cleaners, I’ve donated my books to the library,  and I’ve donated my old records to Rasputin Music & Movies. (Most of the records were not in good condition, but I knew the store would dispose of them properly). This list could go on and on, but I really do try to return items to appropriate locations and organizations.

There is a home for every object in our lives. If we take a little time out, and do a little bit of research on your own, perhaps you can find the best home for it.

Aloe Vera For Your Skin

 

12.13.2016

0800

Of all of the plants I recommend owning, the aloe vera plant is one of them. However, aloe vera plants can grow up to 39 inches in height but grow outwards as well with their offsets.  There are many benefits to using aloe vera as a topical treatment as well as consuming the plant in a daily diet. Here is a list of benefits of Aloe Vera as a topical treatment:

1. It treats sunburn. 

Aloe Vera helps with sunburn through its powerful healing activity at the epithelial level of the skin, a layer of cells that cover the body. It acts as a protective layer on the skin and helps replenish its moisture. Because of its nutritional qualities and antioxidant properties, the skin heals quicker.

2. It acts as a moisturizer. 

Aloe moisturizes the skin without giving it a greasy feel, so it’s perfect for anyone with an oily skin complexion. For women who use mineral-based makeup, aloe vera acts as a moisturizer and is great for the face prior to the application to prevents skin drying. For men: Aloe vera gel can be used as an aftershave treatment as its healing properties can treat small cuts caused by shaving.

3. It treats acne. 

Aloe vera gel contains two hormones: Auxin and Gibberellins. These two hormones provide wound healing and anti-inflammatory properties that reduce skin inflammation. Giberellin in aloe vera acts as a growth hormone stimulating the growth of new cells. It allows the skin to heal quickly and naturally with minimal scarring.

Aloe is soothing and can reduce skin inflammations, blistering and itchiness, while helping the skin to heal more rapidly. Additionally, in Ayurvedic medicine, Aloe is used to effectively heal chronic skin problems, such as psoriasis, acne and eczema.

4. It fights aging. 

As we age, everyone begins to worry about the appearance of fine lines and the loss of elasticity in their skin. Aloe leaves contain a plethora of antioxidants including, beta carotene, vitamin C and E that can help improve the skin’s natural firmness and keep the skin hydrated.

5. It lessens the visibility of stretch marks. 

The skin is like one big piece of elastic that’ll expand and contract as needed to accommodate growth. But if the skin stretches too far, too fast (due to pregnancy, rapid weight gain or loss) the elasticity of the skin can be damaged. That’s what leaves those unsightly stretch marks. These marks appear due to minor tears in the layers of the skin caused by sudden and excessive stretching. Aloe vera gel can help hide these stretch marks by healing these wounds.

What I usually do…

I first cut off the leaves of the aloe vera plant and sliced off of the thorns on each side of one of the leaves. I cut the leaf down the centerline through the meat so I could scrap the aloe vera off of each skin section. I gathered the aloe vera I scraped off into a mason jar and then went ahead and scraped the other leaf in the same manner. I composted everything that was left over.

I usually use the aloe vera gel immediately in which I’ll apply it to my skin on my face and body for about an hour and then rinse it off. This is a simple and natural way to moisturize your skin with an organic substance. This plant in addition to my Golden Pothos Ivy air filtering plant are my two favorites that I own. The Golden Pothos filters my indoor air for me and this one provides me with natural moisturizer, win-win.

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Composting

07.13.2016

0800

DSC_4700

I have a compost at home and I love adding to it. It’s a great way of how I get rid of my food scraps without adding it to the landfill. Currently I use the Lifetime 65 gallon tumbler, which is large enough to add multiple layers of dry leaves and moist food scraps. The design allows me to rotate the pile so I won’t have to run the pile using a hand tool.

Composting is the process of breaking down or decomposing organic materials for use as an excellent soil amendment. Beneficial bacteria and fungi do their part to return this waste into a form usable once again by plants. These microbes need air, water, food, and heat to thrive. Keeping the microbes “happy” will speed up the process.

There are a few benefits of composting such as:

  • Saves landfill space, as well as, time and gas transporting yard waste.
  • Improves the soil’s ability to retain moisture, reducing watering costs.
  • Provides needed humus and nutrients for healthy plants.

With the Lifetime Compost Tumbler, it:

  1. Hides the messy appearance of a compost pile, and takes less space.
  2. Easily rotates saving time and effort of turning a pile.
  3. Reduces smell by enclosing composting material and providing adequate air supply to maintain desired aerobic microbiological activity.
  4. Helps to maintain proper moisture by shedding rain and shielding compost from drying winds.

First I  chose a location on level grass or dirt where drainage won’t affect pavement and a location where it will be convenient to access for loading. This location also has direct sunlight will help heat up the compost, and then I started adding to create my compost pile. I added:

  1. KITCHEN SCRAPS: like fruit and vegetable peelings, cores, eggshells, and coffee grounds.
  2. LAWN CLIPPINGS: can be returned directly to the lawn with a mulching blade or composted as desired, especially if the grass clippings are too long to be left on the lawn.
  3. LEAVES: can be mowed to reduce their size which will speed up decomposition and increase the amount which will fit in the composter.
  4. WOOD: such as branches must be chipped or shredded in pieces smaller than 1 inch. Saw dust must be resin free i.e. no particle board.
  5. PLANTS: discarded from the garden, straw and hay.
  6. MANURES: from herbivores e.g. cows, rabbits, or chickens. Excessive amounts will also increase the salt content of the compost.

But I don’t add:

  1. Meat, bones, greases, dairy products, or bread which attract pests.
  2. Anything treated with pesticides or herbicides.
  3. Black Walnut leaves which inhibit plant growth.
  4. Oak leaves and pine needles which decompose slowly.
  5. Diseased plants or weeds with seeds.
  6. Pet or human waste.
  7. Plastic, foil, etc.

Usually the compost is done when it becomes dark brown and has an earthy smell. I then add the compost directly to ornamental plants as mulch or work into soil. The composter can easily be dragged after dumping to make room for another pile. I usually dump the compost directly onto the soil underneath it and then move it around accordingly. I hope more people will consider composting as a means to get rid of your foods scraps as opposed to dumping them in the trash. Check with your local trash collection agency or recycling center, some have donation stations or pick up services for compost and/or foods scraps . Some areas will also pay you for your compost as well.

DIY Simple Face Exfoliant And Facial Mask

06.01.2016

0600

Materials:

  • 1 Lemon
  • Raw Honey
  • Sea Salt

Tools:

  • Small bowl for mixing

DSC_4639

So this is a Personal Face Exfoliant recipe that I use. It is a simple recipe and it only involves three ingredients. I like to use organic ingredients and it helps that I already own these ingredients in my kitchen cupboards.

Lemons are antibacterial, so they help treat acne. They are also rich in Vitamin C and citric acid, which can help brighten your skin when used over time.

Honey is naturally antibacterial, so it’s great for acne treatment and prevention. It’s also full of antioxidants, so it is great for slowing down aging. Honey is extremely moisturizing and soothing, so it helps create a glow.

By adding the sea salt, the mix becomes an exfoliant and without it, then the recipe can be a mask for your face. Either way, it’s a great and simple treatment for your skin… Enjoy!

Ingredients:

1 Lemon
1 Tbsp of Sea Salt
2 Tbsp of Raw Organic Honey

Steps:

  1. Mix ½ lemon juice + 2 tbsp Raw organic honey + 2 tbsp sea salt
  2. Rinse off face with warm water and then pat down dry
  3. Apply mixture all over face and leave on for 20 minutes
  4. Rinse face off with warm water

Natural Air Filtering Plants

02.17.2016

0800

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Plants are great for indoor decor as well as connecting humans with a little bit of nature. Even better is when you can choose a plant that will benefit you and your family.

I have a Golden Pothos (Scindapsus aures) plant indoor and I’ve had it since May 2013. Golden Pothos are great for filtering formaldehyde and it stays green even when kept in the dark. It’s great for rooms near garages. It needs indirect, bright light and only needs watering once a week or once every week and a half. Originally, when I bought the plant, it looked like this:

2013-05-12 23.11.29

When the plant started cascading over the edge of the hanging flower pot, I found an old metal chain and used it to hang up the plant. I used an S-Hook to adjust the height of the chain over time. S-Hooks are great for making almost any ledge more versatile. As this plant continues to grow, I’ll readjust the height of the chain, but so far it seems happy where it is.

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Some other plants that can be used as natural indoor air filters are:

  1. Aloe (aloe Vera) aloe-vera-plant-1
    1. Great for kitchens &bathrooms
    2. Battles formaldehyde and benzene, which can be a byproduct of chemical-based cleaners, paints and more.
  2. Spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum)Chlorophytum-comosum-zebra-spider-plant-620x412
    1. Great for all residential rooms
    2. Battles benezene, formaldehyde, carbon momoxide and xylene, a solvent used in the leather, rubber and printing industries. This plant is very easy to grow and maintain being that it prefers cool to average temperatures and dry soil. It needs bright indirect light to keep growing.
  3. Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera jamesonii)Gerbera jamesonii
    1. Great for laundry room & bedroom
    2. Can remove trichloroethylene and benzene from pollutants that come home with dry cleaning and inks . This plant needs lots of light and well drained soil.
  4. Snake Plant (Sansevieria trifasciata ‘Laurentii’) Snake Plant (Sansevieria trifasciata 'Laurentii'
    1. Great for the bathroom, kitchen & bedroom
    2. Filters formaldehyde, which is common in cleaning products and carbon monoxide, which is common in toilet paper, tissues and personal care products. It also releases oxygen at night. These thrive in low light and steamy humid conditions.
  5. Chrysanthemum (Chrysantheium morifolium) chrysanthemum_morifolium
    1. Great for bedrooms, office, kitchen and laundry room
    2. This plant not only brightens up a room with it’s unique colors, but it filters benzene, which is commonly found in glue, paint, plastics and detergent. It needs bright light in order for the buds to open, but not direct sunlight.
  6. Red-edged Dracaena (Dracaena marginata) RedEdgedDrac
    1. Great for living rooms, dining rooms &kitchens
    2. This plant removes xylene, trichloroethylene and formaldehyde, which can seep into indoor air through lacquers, varnishes and gasoline. It grows slowly, but can reach up to 15 feet in height, so it’s suggested that this plant be placed in a area with a high ceiling, but with moderate sunlight.
  7. Weeping Fig (Ficus benjamina)   download
    1. Great for living rooms
    2. Can filter out formaldehyde, benzene and trichloroethylene, which come from pollutants that typically accompany carpeting and furniture. This plant is a little tricky to take care of with but with the right amount of light, water and temperature, it can grow into a beautiful sculpture.
  8. Azalea (Rhododendron simsii) Rhododendron-simsii-2
    1. Great for living rooms, dining rooms, basements
    2. This shrub can battle formaldehyde from sources such as plywood or foam insulation. These plants strive in temperatures that range between 60-65 °F.
  9. Warneck Dracaena (Dracaena deremensis ‘Warneckii’) dracaena-warneckiei-plant
    1. Great for living rooms, dining rooms and kitchens.
    2. This plant can combat pollutants associated with varnishes and oils. Keep in mind that this plant has the potential to reach 12 feet high and grows easily in an indoor environment, even without direct sunlight.
  10. Chinese Evergreen (Aglaonema Crispum ‘Deborah’) Chinese-evergreen-Aglaonema-crispum-Deborah
    1. Great for all residential rooms
    2. Filters a number of pollutants and will remove more toxins over time with more exposure. This plant has been nicknamed “the easiest houseplant” because it will thrive in low light and can survive in places other plants cannot. These plants like humid air so misting the leaves occasionally will keep them happy.
  11. Bamboo Palm (Chamaedorea Sefritzii) bamboo-palm-tree-chamaedorea-seifrizii-20-01-b-realpalmtrees.com
    1. Great for living rooms, dinging rooms and kitchens
    2. This plant filters out both benzene and trichloroethylene. It should be placed around furniture that could be off-gassing formaldehyde. It prefers humidity and bright indirect sunlight.
  12. Heart Leaf Philodendron (Philodendron oxycardium) Heart Leaf Philodendron (Philodendron oxycardium
    1. Great for all residential rooms
    2. Can remove all kinds of VOCs (Volatile organic compounds) and formaldehyde from sources like particleboard. However, it is toxic when eaten so keep out of reach of children and pets. This plant is very low maintenance and needs indirect light with room for its vines to grow.

Consider using an indoor plant that filters air naturally. Make sure you check the maximum height at which the plant will inevitably grow to and if they need to be re-potted into a larger pot . It’s better to not be surprised a few months into this investment. These plants can help clean indoor air on Earth, which is typically far more polluted than outdoor air and the benefits also include creating a more sustainable indoor environment.